Thursday, May 17, 2012
Famous landmarks like the city's Opera House and Harbour Bridge may be the first port of call for many people visiting Sydney, but those who have the time to venture out of the city centre will find that this Australian tourism hotspot has much more to offer.
 
From the alternative style and outdoor spaces of Glebe to the shops and art galleries of Darlinghurst, Sydney's less central areas offer more than enough experiences to ensure any trip to this destination is a memorable one.





Newtown
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A visit to Newtown could be a good option for anyone hoping to enjoy some entertainment during a trip to Sydney, with a number of theatres and clubs located in the neighbourhood.
 
The Newtown Theatre regularly hosts unusual avant-garde shows and performances, while the Enmore Theatre offers live music, comedy and more.
 
Located about 4km outside the CBD, Newtown is also home to more than 100 restaurants and cafes serving all sorts of cuisine along King Street, the district's vibrant main thoroughfare.
 
Landmarks to look out for in the area include St Stephen's Anglican Church, a Gothic revival-style building that has been welcoming churchgoers every Sunday since 1849.

 
Darlinghurst
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Darlinghurst is a densely populated suburb to the east of Sydney's central business district (CBD). It is known for its numerous fashion boutiques, bookshops, art galleries and music stores, where shoppers can spend hours browsing through potential souvenirs and gifts for friends and family.
 
The main thoroughfare in the area is Oxford Street, which bursts into colourful life every March when it hosts a Mardi Gras parade for the gay and lesbian community.
 
Darlinghurst is also home to a thriving culinary scene, with plenty of cafes, tapas bars, restaurants, lounges and other establishments to choose from.
 
Visitors can also check out attractions such as the Sydney Jewish Museum and Oxford Art Factory in the district.

 
Surry Hills
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Also situated to the east of the Sydney CBD is Surry Hills, which tourism agency Destination NSW describes as one of the city's most "artistically vibrant neighbourhoods".
 
Visitors can learn more about this aspect of the area by setting off on a walk from Crown Street and stopping off at galleries and boutiques.
 
Particular highlights to look out for include the Ray Hughes Gallery, the Brett Whiteley Studio and the Object Australian Centre for Design and Craft on Bourke Street, which hosts regular exhibitions and educational programmes.
 
Surry Hills also boasts one of the highest concentrations of restaurants of any Sydney suburb and outdoor spaces such as Prince Alfred and Harmony parks.

 
Glebe
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Glebe is surrounded by the Sydney Harbour inlets of Blackwattle Bay and Rozelle Bay, in a location about 3km south-west of the CBD. Its close proximity to two universities means it is home to thousands of students and academics from around the world, making it a varied and open-minded community.
 
A good way to start a tour of the neighbourhood is by taking a walk along Glebe Point Road, which is home to quirky shops, galleries and traditional pubs like The Nag's Head.
 
Nature lovers can head for the Glebe Foreshore Walk, which runs from Bicentennial Park to the Sydney Fish Market and encompasses over 27 hectares of open space, while bargain hunters should check out the markets that are held every Saturday.

 
Bondi Beach
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A trip to Bondi Beach will be on the to-do lists of many travellers visiting Sydney, mainly because of the famous stretch of seafront that gives the suburb its name.
 
The beach is about 1km long and is a popular gathering point for all sorts of people, from hardcore surfers and keen swimmers to fashionable types whose main aim is to relax on the sand and look glamorous.
 
At the heart of the area is Bondi Pavilion, which comprises cafes, a theatre and an art gallery. The water near the pavilion is the safest and most popular for swimming, while the southern end of the beach is known for more hazardous conditions.
 
Visitors might also be interested in taking a walk away from the seafront to learn more about the community and culture surrounding this famous destination.