Thursday, May 17, 2012
Paris is famous as a global centre of art and culture, with celebrated museums such as the Louvre housing works by some of the greatest painters and sculptors in history.

However, visitors to the French capital can experience many stunning works of art without having to enter a museum or visit a gallery, simply by walking down the street.
 
The city has become a thriving hub for graffiti and street art in recent years, with many of its artists and their colourful spray-paint creations now enjoying worldwide fame.
 
Talking a stroll through Paris will reveal examples of this urgent and unbridled creativity on doors, alleyways, park benches, bridges and buildings in almost every district.


Space Invaders
The Space Invaders are among the most famous recurring street art themes in Paris. Pixelated images of characters from the classic 1980s computer game can be found in unusual spots all over the city, with some people making it their mission to find as many as they can.
 
A street artist known as Invader is responsible for the images, which are made from small mosaic tiles. He started his 'invasion' of the French capital in the mid-1990s and has since branched out by taking his art work to cities across France and further afield.

 
Belleville
This bustling, multicultural neighbourhood is arguably the centre of the Paris street art scene. Graffiti and stencil art can be found on walls throughout the area, although newcomers may like to start by visiting Rue Denoyez.
 
Graffiti is authorised on this street, helping to transform it from a previously rundown corner of the city to a busy area frequented by locals and tourists. The centrepiece of Rue Denoyez - also known locally as Rue du Graffiti - is a wall that features a vibrant and constantly changing selection of murals as artists paint over their previous works.
 
This means that the area rewards visitors who go back repeatedly, as they are likely to see a completely different version of the wall each time they return. 

 
Rue Ordener 
Located in the neighbourhood of La Goutte d'Or in the 18th arrondissement, Rue Ordener features another wall on which graffiti art is legally encouraged as a form of expression for creative Parisians.
 
The 100-metre long wall features an assortment of tags, symbols, cartoon characters and slogans, with the cryptic phrase "Paris is not a dream" appearing alongside an image of Daffy Duck.
 
 
Rue Philippe de Girard
People exploring Paris on foot may notice the occasional safari animal amid the concrete walkways and office buildings. These exotic beasts are the creation of Mosko and associates, the name used by street art duo Michel Allemand and Gerard Laux.
 
The best place to view their work is the Rue Philippe de Girard, a crumbling street in the 18th arrondissement where beautifully drawn leopards, zebra and parrots adorn the walls.

 
Rue Albert Marquet
For those who prefer their street art to be more three-dimensional, this street in the 20th arrondissement contains an interesting piece, again with a wildlife theme. A large bronze salamander clings to the side of one of the buildings on Rue Albert Marquet.